Eternal Security – Dealing with the Difficult Texts (Romans 11:22)

One of our leaders asked me about Romans 11.22, which says…

22 Note then the kindness and the severity of God: severity toward those who have fallen, but God’s kindness to you, provided you continue in his kindness. Otherwise you too will be cut off. (ESV)

22Consider therefore the kindness and sternness of God: sternness to those who fell, but kindness to you, provided that you continue in his kindness. Otherwise, you also will be cut off. (NIV)

22Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: on them which fell, severity; but toward thee, goodness, if thou continue in his goodness: otherwise thou also shalt be cut off. (KJV)

John MacArthur comments on this verse:

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Eternal Security – Dealing with the Difficult Texts (Galatians 5:4)

Yesterday at Harvest I preached a message titled, “Can a Christian lose his salvation?” and answered that question with a resounding no. A true Christian is secure for all of eternity and nothing can change that. God has promised that once he begins a good work of salvation in a person’s life, he will be faithful to complete that work (Philippians 1.6). Nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ (Romans 8.31-39). Jesus has promised that for those who come to Him, He will never, ever cast them out (John 6.37). Many other Scriptures affirm this comforting truth.

As promised in my message yesterday to the saints of HBC Jacksonville, I would like to take a look at some of the so-called troublesome passages when dealing with the doctrine of eternal security. Today I would like to take a look at Galatians 5.4. Here is the verse from three of the most popular Bible translations:

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Albert Mohler’s Recommendations for Reading

June 1st. For many people, the unofficial start of summer. For the past few years, Dr. Albert Mohler has been publishing a list of recommended books to read each summer. Today he released this summer’s list on his blog.  All ten recommendations are non-fiction history, with the vast majority of that history covering the mid-1800s through the mid-1900s. Not exactly a variety of genres, but Mohler offers no apologies, writing, “Those looking for books on birds and romance should consult some other list.” But if you are into history, you might want to consider these works.