Gladwell on Football and Dogfighting

About a month ago I decided the best thing that could be changed in the sport of football would be to get rid of the helmets. It would bring the sport back to tackling by wrapping a guy and would result in less head injuries. Reading Malcolm Gladwell’s recent masterpiece for the New Yorker has strengthened my position on the matter. Here is a small portion of the article for you to sample:

In the nineteenth century, dogfighting was widely accepted by the American public. But we no longer find that kind of transaction morally acceptable in a sport. “I was not aware of dogfighting and the terrible things that happen around dogfighting,” Goodell said, explaining why he responded so sternly in the Vick case. One wonders whether, had he spent as much time talking to Kyle Turley as he did to Michael Vick, he’d start to have similar doubts about his own sport.”

Some Questions Every Pastor Should Ask Himself

Craig Groeschel, in his book it, asks some questions every pastor should ask every once in a while. These are the type of questions that help keep me centered. It has been the practice of asking myself these kinds of questions that, I am convinced, has kept me in vocational ministry. For those of you have been in full-time vocational ministry for long, and who care deeply about the effectiveness of the ministry to which you have been assigned, you will understand what I am talking about as you read these questions:

Have you forsaken your first love? Be honest. Do you love ministry more than you love Christ? Do you care more about what people think about you than what God thinks about you? Do you strategize about ways to grow your ministry more than you think about how to grow God’s people? Do you study the Bible more to preach more than you study it to hear from God? Do you pray more often in public than you do in private? Have you lost your first love?”   – Craig Groeschel, it, p. 170.